Ultra Low Interest Rates Have Hurt Retired Investors

Investors are increasingly focused on the task of finding retirement income. Sadly since 2009, one and two year CD’s have earned much less than 1% a year. On the other hand, inflation has been over 2% a year. The result has been a significant loss of principle as many retirees have had to cash in their CD’s to make up for the income shortfall. Since 2009, most CD’s have lost 6-10% of their purchasing value to inflation.

In this graphic, CD rates have been under the black line (inflation) most of the time since 2002.

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Many income investors have responded to the failure of CD’s in this ultra low interest rate world by investing in diversified income portfolios. Diversification smooths price fluctuations and puts money to work in places that provide income and sometimes appreciation as well. These portfolios are generating income above the rate of inflation and preserving purchasing power but they don’t have the fixed price guarantee of a CD. That is the tradeoff. Fluctuating account value with sufficient income or fixed account value with insufficient income.
It is believed by many respected analysts that in the next few years inflation is very likely to make a return. Income investors should be positioned for that. Diversified income investing can offer solutions should interest rates and inflation begin rising and can even look to profit from it. On the other hand, CD investors will have to keep investing short term in ultra-low interest rates until rates get higher. That means more of the same slow loss of purchasing power and draws on principle.